• Prue Gildea
  1. Dr Mohammad Taha named one of Australia’s 30 most innovative by Engineers Australia

    Headshot of Dr Taha
    Dr Taha has been recognised for their work synthesising a self-modifying coating that adapts to its environment and limits heat radiation.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2019/07/19/dr-mohammad-taha-named-one-of-australias-30-most-innovative-by-engineers-australia

  2. An open letter from scientists on the Murray-Darling Basin


    The recent ABC Four Corners program ‘Cash Splash’ portrayed implementation of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan as a “failure and a farce”, asserting that it constituted a gross waste of public money and was producing little to no benefit.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2019/07/19/an-open-letter-from-scientists-on-the-murray-darling-basin

  3. Associate Professor Andrew Zalesky named one of Australia’s 30 most innovative by Engineers Australia

    Andrew Zalesky standing next to MRI
    Engineers Australia magazine, Create, recognised two Melbourne School of Engineering academics amongst the top 30 most innovative. Here, Associate Professor Andrew Zalesky reflects upon this honour.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2019/07/15/associate-professor-andrew-zalesky-named-one-of-australias-30-most-innovative-by-engineers-australia

  4. A 35 year career in IT sees rapid change; Dr Rod Dilnutt made Fellow of the British Computer Society

    Computer terminal c1987
    In a world where processing involved pens, paper and time, Dr Rod Dilnutt’s work with computers was an exciting and innovative new approach; a sign of progresses to be made.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2019/07/08/a-35-year-career-in-it-sees-rapid-change-dr-rod-dilnutt-made-fellow-of-the-british-computer-society

  5. Seemingly random seizures not so random

    X-ray of head in front of stylised neuron
    What do earthquakes, financial market crashes, wars and epileptic seizures all have in common?

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2018/12/12/seemingly-random-seizures-not-so-random

  6. A year of success for AIMES – 2018 in review


    2018 has been a year of progress for the Australian Integrated Multimodal EcoSystem (AIMES), a world-first living laboratory incubated at the University of Melbourne.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2018/12/10/a-year-of-success-for-aimes-2018-in-review

  7. Engineering our future


    The immense environmental, social and economic value that engineering and allied areas bring to the state are highlighted in the recently released Victorian State of Engineering Report.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2018/11/23/engineering-our-future

  8. Giving a dam: University of Melbourne researchers appointed to Murray Darling Basin advisory committee


    The Murray-Darling Basin Authority (MDBA) has announced the appointment of seven distinguished Australian scientists and engineers to the independent body that helps guide the Murray-Darling Basin Plan.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2018/11/05/giving-a-dam-university-of-melbourne-researchers-appointed-to-murray-darling-basin-advisory-committee

  9. Smart sensors provide low-cost solution to monitor air quality


    An environmental focus of the Australian Integrated Multimodal Ecosystem (AIMES*), has seen a new range of “smart” environmental sensors in place in central Melbourne.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2018/07/12/smart-sensors-provide-low-cost-solution-to-monitor-air-quality

  10. ARC grant helps biomedical engineers develop algorithms to restore sight

    Photo of eye with futuristic overlay
    A Biomedical Engineering research group was recently awarded a linkage grant from the Australian Research Council.

    ingenium.eng.unimelb.edu.au/2018/07/04/arc-grant-helps-biomedical-engineers-develop-algorithms-to-restore-sight

Number of posts found: 12