Reflections on the Melbourne Entrepreneurship Gala: a student perspective

By Pru Brew

Christopher Sangma on MEC Gala red carpet

Early this month over 750 guests converged at the Palladium for the Melbourne Entrepreneurship Gala. The evening is a celebration of entrepreneurship and has become the largest event of its kind in Australia. This event brings together representatives from industry and government, and emerging and established innovators from the entrepreneurship community. University of Melbourne student, Christopher Sangma, was provided the opportunity to attend and shared his experience with us.

After completing his undergraduate degree in Bangladesh, Christopher moved to Melbourne earlier this year to study a Master of Information Technology at the University of Melbourne.

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Watch out for coastal and ocean extremes – an interview with Professor Ian Young

By Professor Greg Foliente

Professor Ian Young standing in front of bushesProfessor Ian Young (Image:GovInsider)

With the University of Melbourne’s Centre for Disaster Management and Public Safety (CDMPS) adding to its research portfolio through the establishment of a new research unit on Coastal and Ocean Extremes, the Centre’s Deputy Director and Manager Professor Greg Foliente had a chat with the Unit’s new Leader Professor Ian Young. Continue reading “Watch out for coastal and ocean extremes – an interview with Professor Ian Young”


Reflections on the Emory Global Health Case Competition

By Tom Strawhorn

Tom Strawhorn (second from right) with his team in Atlanta. Image: supplied

This year a team of six University of Melbourne students won the Emory Global Health Case Competition (GHCC) in Atlanta, for the first time since the University began competing in 2014. For civil engineering student Tom Strawhorn, the experience affirmed how his skills in problem-solving can be applied beyond the field of engineering.

I first heard about the Global Health Case Competition through a friend. I was a bit hesitant to get involved because it was a discipline I knew little about and wasn’t sure how my engineering skillset would apply to the case.

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Dr Mohammad Taha named one of Australia’s 30 most innovative by Engineers Australia

By Prue Gildea

Headshot of Dr Taha

Dr Mohammad Taha is a newly minted PhD, and they like the sound of those words; Dr Taha.

After years of dedicated research work, having the title has added a spring to the step as Dr Taha cruises around the University of Melbourne’s leafy Parkville campus. And now with recognition as one of the 30 most innovative engineers of 2019 as voted by a judging panel for Engineers Australia, the future is looking bright for Dr Taha.

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An open letter from scientists on the Murray-Darling Basin

The recent ABC Four Corners program ‘Cash Splash’ portrayed implementation of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan as a “failure and a farce”, asserting that it constituted a gross waste of public money and was producing little to no benefit.

Reports like this amplify superficial and sensationalist stories running in the media since the critical reporting of the SA Royal Commission into the Murray-Darling Basin. These stories have invoked the name of science to justify claims of the Plan’s failures, lending an air of credibility to calls by various interests to “pause the Plan”, or worse, scrap it altogether and conduct a witch hunt to embarrass public officials involved in the water reforms.

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Associate Professor Andrew Zalesky named one of Australia’s 30 most innovative by Engineers Australia

As told to Prue Gildea

Andrew Zalesky standing next to MRI

Engineers Australia magazine, Create, recognised two Melbourne School of Engineering academics amongst the top 30 most innovative. Here, Associate Professor Andrew Zalesky reflects upon this honour.

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A 35 year career in IT sees rapid change; Dr Rod Dilnutt made Fellow of the British Computer Society

By Dr Rod Dilnutt, Computing and Information Systems

Computer terminal c1987Computer terminal c1987. Image courtesy University of Melbourne

To be recognised as a Fellow of the British Computer Society is very humbling. As I reflect on the world around me in 2019 it seems so far removed from where I started my career almost 35 years ago when music was played on vinyl and a computer in your pocket (like an iPhone) seemed impossibly futuristic.

My first job as a business analyst developed requirements for an information system that was to manage disability pension claims. Claims were processed manually and this system was the first introduction of computer-based support to make payments directly into bank accounts. Through the lens of 2019 this does not seem so exotic, but in a world where processing involved pens, paper and time, it was an exciting and innovative new approach; a sign of progresses to be made.
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How the study of cheese microstructures helps develop better dairy

By Carl Jackson

Magnified image of cream cheese microstructureCream cheese microstructure

Have you ever bitten into a delicious slice of pizza and paused to consider how the alignment of proteins impacts the mozzarella’s stretchiness? Or thought about how by-products from manufacturing the cream cheese you just smeared on a freshly toasted bagel could be repurposed for other foods?

In the ARC Dairy Innovation Hub, these are the sorts of things Dr Lydia Ong considers daily – working on analysing cheese microstructures to engineer products that are higher quality, cheaper to produce and which create less waste during the manufacturing process. Continue reading “How the study of cheese microstructures helps develop better dairy”


Students pitch transport solutions at Case Competition final

Last month, five multidisciplinary engineering and IT teams took to the stage at the annual MSE Case Competition final, presenting their concepts for a Gateway Link and precinct solution for Fishermans Bend.

Competition winners(L-R):  Khoa Tran, Master of Engineering (Electrical with Business); Karina Lee, Master of Engineering (Mechatronics); Jacky Li, Master of Engineering (Mechanical with Business); Dean Peach, Master of Engineering (Mechanical); Steven Lam, Master of Engineering (Mechanical with Business).

Sponsored by industry partner WSP Australia, one of the world’s leading engineering professional services consulting firms, the 2019 Case Competition provided students with a unique opportunity to extend their learning beyond the classroom and interact with members from industry.

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Experts share: three things to know about working in a small-to-medium-enterprise

By Melbourne School of Engineering

Working in a small to medium enterprise

In Australia, small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs) employ around 4.8 million workers and generate an approximate 57% of Australia’s GDP. Start-ups and SMEs can offer students a fantastic platform to launch their careers through internships and entry level positions with the opportunity to develop new skills, experience new challenges and make a strong impact on the success of the organisation.

Earlier this semester, Melbourne School of Engineering as part of the 2019 Professional Skills Series hosted five industry leaders to hear the intricacies of working within an SME in Australia.

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